endtheviolencespokane.org

Welcome to Day #2 of the ETV Conference. Please follow the link to fill out the survey after each session. https://forms.gle/594BXqPzqsmNNcS86

ETV CONFERENCE 2024

Empowering domestic violence professionals in the Pacific Northwest with cutting-edge training at the End the Violence Conference.

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JOIN US FOR THE 2024 END THE VIOLENCE CONFERENCE

Join us for the three-day, End the Violence Conference, which is tailored for individuals employed in these suggested fields:
Law Enforcement  •  Prosecution  •  Attorneys  •  Judges  •  First Responders  •  Victim Advocates  •  Other Professionals working with domestic violence survivors, perpetrators and families.

February 27-29
Spokane Community College, The Lair Event Center

Up to 15 CEUs, CLEs, and Clock Hours are approved for this event.

Parking Information: Please utilize the Special Event Parking Virtual Permit for your convenience. This permit is unique to our event and will be valid from 6:30 AM on February 27th until 5:00 PM on February 29th or until the allocated permits are exhausted.

To register your vehicles:

  • Select the state of your license plate
  • Enter your license plate number – please note: your license plate is your permit. Ensure it is accurate.
  • Select the make of your vehicle
  • Select the style of your vehicle
  • Select the color of your vehicle
  • Click “Register.”

Once your vehicle is registered, you may park in any student or faculty spot on campus.

**Please note: You will need to register your vehicle for the event for each day you are planning on being on campus.

If you have any questions, please get in touch with the Office of Campus Security at 533-3555.

Conference Goals

At the End the Violence Conference, our primary objective is to equip attendees with the latest insights, tools, and techniques to effectively address and combat domestic violence. This event will feature expert speakers, interactive workshops, and networking opportunities, all designed to enhance the knowledge and skills of professionals working with domestic violence cases.

CEU’s and Clock Hours will be available. 

Agenda - Tuesday, February 27

10:45 am Advocacy Track  (Littlefoot Room)

Blaine & Taylor from The Arc of Spokane - Justice & IDD (Intellectual Developmental Disabilities)

10:45 am Law Enforcement Track  (Bigfoot Room)

David Martin, J.D. - Recantation and Domestic Violence: The Untold Story

10:45 am Judicial Track (Sasquatch Room)

Corp. Angela Weekes - A Trauma-Informed Lens

2:45 pm Advocacy Track (Littlefoot Room)

Christina Love - How we Heal: Historical Trauma, Generational Trauma and Personal Trauma - Healing Outside of Time

2:45 pm Law Enforcement Track (Bigfoot Room)

Kim Wyatt and Shaya Calvo - ERPO, Extreme Risk Protection Orders

2:45 pm Judicial Track (Sasquatch Room)

Ginger Johnson - Domestic Violence Treatment for Offenders and why it matters.

Agenda - Wednesday, February 28

10:45 am Advocacy Track (Littlefoot Room)

Mujeres in Action - Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Victim Advocacy: Responding to the Latine Community Through a Cultural Lens.

10:45 am Law Enforcement Track (Bigfoot Room)

Angela Weekes - A Trauma Informed Lens

10:45 am Judicial Track

Dr. Alice Ellyson - Findings from court records on firearm and weapon use and relinquishment.

2:45 Advocacy Track (Littlefoot Room) 

Rachel Ramirez - ODVN Evidence Based CARE Framework

2:45 pm Law Enforcement Track (Bigfoot Room)

Dawn Pullin - Missing and Murdered Indigenous People (MMIP) Crisis

2:45 pm Judicial Track     

Dr. Faith Lutz - Capturing the Cruelty of IPV: The Utility of Real Time Data Collection by the Police

Networking Happy Hour 4:30 - 8:00 pm Safari Room at the Davenport
*See below for more details

Agenda - Thursday, February 29

12:30 pm Advocacy Track (Littlefoot Room) 

Lutheran Community Services - Navigating the complexities of Family Dynamics in building good Safety plans.

12:30 pm Law Enforcement and Judicial Track

Elizabeth Hendren - Updates on legislation in Washington State

Thank you for attending!

Networking Happy Hour 4:30 to 8 pm

Wednesday February 28, 2024

Safari Room at the Davenport

$15 Drink tickets will be given to attendees.

Featured Speakers:

Christina Love, NADAAC, NCPRSS, CPSS, CRC, CGF  – Christina Love, a proud Alutiiq/Sugpiaq woman (she/her), brings her authentic voice and transformative spirit to the forefront as an internationally acclaimed speaker, educator, consultant, recovery coach, and civil and human rights activist. Born on the beautiful land of Fairbanks, hailing from the rich ancestral lands of Egegik village and nurtured in the vibrant village of Chitina, Alaska, Christina embodies the strength and resilience of her heritage and each community that has raised her.

With a deep commitment to systems change and advocacy for marginalized/targeted populations, Christina’s journey has been shaped by her own experiences as an adult and child survivor of physical and sexual abuse, a formerly incarcerated individual in long-term recovery, and as a person who has experienced homelessness and disabilities. As an educator and storyteller, Christina focuses on the intersectionality of trauma, substance use and mental health with a primary focus on how we heal as individuals and communities. Christina is part of leading a collective movement that works to end violence, oppression, shame, and stigma through the liberation of education, community healing, and storytelling.

David Martin, J.D. is a Senior Deputy Prosecutor for the King County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office (KCPAO) in Seattle, Washington. He serves as supervisor of the KCPAO Domestic Violence (DV) unit, co-manager of the King County Regional Domestic Violence Firearms Enforcement Unit, and a Fulbright Specialist in Gender Based Violence response. David has created innovative responses to serve victims of DV from the first evidence rule on immigration to systemic provision of civil legal aid in criminal cases, to diversion and sentence alternatives for defendants with past histories of gender violence victimization. David serves on numerous DV task forces and work groups, is chair of the national Association of Prosecuting Attorney’s Domestic Violence Committee. David has authored several of Washington’s criminal DV laws including felony sentencing reform, removal of the marital rape exception, stalking. 

Amy Bonomi, PhD, MPH, is Professor and Associate Dean of Strategic Initiatives in the College of Health and Human Services at Northern Arizona University, Founder of Social Justice Associates, Faculty Affiliate at the Harborview Injury Prevention and Research Center, and Consultant for the U.S. Department of Justice. Bonomi’s distinguished career as an award-winning professor at the Ohio State University and Michigan State University includes widely cited research on domestic violence, recantation, and long-term health impacts. Bonomi and her research team (including David Martin) published the five-stage model of how domestic abusers tamper with and coerce victims to recant. The five-stage model (along with the team’s subsequent publications) has been used to train professionals globally. Bonomi continues the practice of expert testimony work to describe the dynamics of recantation. As a result of her work in recantation and broader domestic violence topics, Bonomi received the Distinguished Scholar Award from the Ohio State University and was named Diversity Champion in the College of Social Science at Michigan State University. Bonomi is appointed by the U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary (Xavier Becerra) as Chair of the Board of Scientific Counselors for the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control and serves as an elected peer reviewer (for violence prevention research) for the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institute of Justice.Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.

Laura is a renowned criminal behavioral analyst and international expert on domestic violence, stalking, sexual violence, homicide and risk assessment. After a decade of analyzing violent crime at New Scotland Yard Laura became the violence adviser to the National Police Chiefs Council (NPCC). Trained by world leaders at the Behavioral Analysis Unit, National Centre for the Analysis of Violent Crime at the FBI and New Scotland Yard, Laura has applied her psychology degrees to analyze violent crime from a behavioral and preventative perspective.
Laura has a BSc in Psychology and Sociology and an MSc in Forensic and Legal Psychology, and with a background in intelligence-led policing, has been the architect of stalking and coercive control law reform to better protect victims on eight occasions, winning numerous awards for her work.

Rachel Ramirez is the Director of Health and Disability Programs and the Founder of The Center on Partner-Inflicted Brain Injury at The Ohio Domestic Violence Network (ODVN). Her focus is on supporting professionals and systems to better understand traumatic stress and the impact of brain injury, which translates into more accessible and effective services. She provides extensive statewide, national, and international training, technical assistance, consultation, and program support. Rachel has developed extensive resources and tools for professionals on traumatic stress and brain injury, co-authored several peer reviewed journal articles and has been featured on National Public Radio as well as in The New York Times Magazine and The Washington Post. Rachel is a licensed independent social worker and a registered advocate with senior standing and has been with ODVN for 16 years.

Alice M. Ellyson, MS, PhD, is an Assistant Professor at the University of Washington, specializing in gender-based violence research. She earned her BBA in Economics from Mercer University and completed her MS and PhD in Economics with a focus on health, law, and public policy at Florida State University. Dr. Ellyson conducted post-doctoral training at the University of Washington’s Comparative Health Outcomes, Policy, and Economics Institute. Her research aims to reduce gender-based violence and its negative consequences by providing actionable policy recommendations. Using rigorous empirical methods, she evaluates firearm prohibitions in domestic violence protection orders, explores higher education policies’ impact on gender-based violence among students, and examines threats and violence involving weapons among children in homes with intimate partner violence.

Advocacy Track

Join Blaine & Taylor from The Arc of Spokane to learn about how, as service providers, you may have an important role in helping someone with Intellectual Developmental Disability (IDD) define justice after victimization. Often services for this population are inadequate or lumped in with services for other demographics which do not address their specific needs. This session will help you understand specific barriers faced by people with IDD when accessing services, reporting abuse, or trying to get out of a dangerous situation. This includes strategies/best practices law enforcement, advocates, and other public service providers may all employ to restore justice, dignity, and power back to the person it was taken away from.

Christina Love, NADAAC, NCPRSS, CPSS, CRC, CGF  – Christina Love, a proud Alutiiq/Sugpiaq woman (she/her), brings her authentic voice and transformative spirit to the forefront as an internationally acclaimed speaker, educator, consultant, recovery coach, and civil and human rights activist. Born on the beautiful land of Fairbanks, hailing from the rich ancestral lands of Egegik village and nurtured in the vibrant village of Chitina, Alaska, Christina embodies the strength and resilience of her heritage and each community that has raised her.

With a deep commitment to systems change and advocacy for marginalized/targeted populations, Christina’s journey has been shaped by her own experiences as an adult and child survivor of physical and sexual abuse, a formerly incarcerated individual in long-term recovery, and as a person who has experienced homelessness and disabilities. As an educator and storyteller, Christina focuses on the intersectionality of trauma, substance use and mental health with a primary focus on how we heal as individuals and communities. Christina is part of leading a collective movement that works to end violence, oppression, shame, and stigma through the liberation of education, community healing, and storytelling.

MiA – Mujeres in Action is the first organization in the Spokane region dedicated to serving survivors of domestic and sexual violence from Latinx communities.

MiA began in 2018 when founder and executive director, Hanncel Sanchez, realized there was a gap in culturally responsive services for Spanish-speaking survivors of domestic and/or sexual violence. She shared her concern with otr@s and gained support not only from her family, pastors and professor at Eastern Washington University, but also from Lutheran Community Services Northwest and the YWCA of Spokane. At the end of September 2018, MiA was officially launched to the community with the Break the Silence workshop. Since then, MiA has been providing life-saving, culturally responsive services and resources to l@s Latinx survivors and their families, as well as educating the community from a Latinx perspective to end family violence. Today, MiA has a staff of 8 employees and continues to grow to meet the high demand for its services. In 2021, MiA helped 147 people. In 2022, there were more than 300 people including ongoing support and coordination of services to 150 survivors.

Rachel Ramirez is the Director of Health and Disability Programs and the Founder of The Center on Partner-Inflicted Brain Injury at The Ohio Domestic Violence Network (ODVN). Her focus is on supporting professionals and systems to better understand traumatic stress and the impact of brain injury, which translates into more accessible and effective services. She provides extensive statewide, national, and international training, technical assistance, consultation, and program support. Rachel has developed extensive resources and tools for professionals on traumatic stress and brain injury, co-authored several peer reviewed journal articles and has been featured on National Public Radio as well as in The New York Times Magazine and The Washington Post. Rachel is a licensed independent social worker and a registered advocate with senior standing and has been with ODVN for 16 years.

Kristina Hammond is a certified Washington state crime victim advocate with 20+ of experience working with individuals within Judicial systems throughout Washington State. She has presented on the national level both on courtroom innovations and Innovative Approaches to Victim-Centered Justice for People with Intellectual Disabilities and Older Adults. In October of 2021 Kristina was appointed to the Washington State Certified Professional Guardianship Board where she chairs the Education committee and is part of the Standards of Practice Committee. She also started and heads the Elder Abuse Task Force locally.

Law Enforcement Track

David Martin, J.D. is a Senior Deputy Prosecutor for the King County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office (KCPAO) in Seattle, Washington. He serves as supervisor of the KCPAO Domestic Violence (DV) unit, co-manager of the King County Regional Domestic Violence Firearms Enforcement Unit, and a Fulbright Specialist in Gender Based Violence response. David has created innovative responses to serve victims of DV from the first evidence rule on immigration to systemic provision of civil legal aid in criminal cases, to diversion and sentence alternatives for defendants with past histories of gender violence victimization. David serves on numerous DV task forces and work groups, is chair of the national Association of Prosecuting Attorney’s Domestic Violence Committee. David has authored several of Washington’s criminal DV laws including felony sentencing reform, removal of the marital rape exception, stalking. 

Shaya Calvo, DPA Senior Deputy Prosecuting Attorney with the King County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for Extreme Risk Protection Orders- ERPO

KIMBERLY WYATT, DPA is a Senior Deputy Prosecuting Attorney with the King County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office. She has been with the office since 2001. Kim has worked on cases involving domestic violence, stalking, sexual assault, child abuse, and other crimes of violence. Most recently, Kim has been part of the newly formed Domestic Violence Regional Firearms Enforcement Unit. In this role, she advises law enforcement and families on all aspects of Extreme Risk Protection Orders from investigations to the court proceedings. Kim also works on firearm compliance cases and high risk domestic violence firearm offenders. In 2018, Kim was named as the representative of the Association of Prosecuting Attorneys at the American Law Institute working group on model code for Extreme Risk Protection Orders. Kim is the recipient of the City of Seattle Attorney’s Office 2016 Domestic Violence Impact Award. Kim also has expertise in stalking cases and is national trained as a Professional Trainer on Stalking Victimization with the Office of Violence Against Women-Department of Justice. Kim most recently testified before the United States Senate-Committee on the Judiciary, regarding Extreme Risk Protection Orders (2019 and again in 2021). Kim also was a presenter at Seattle University School of Law’s DV Symposiums (2020, 2018, 2017 and 2013), and she has also testified before the Washington State Senate on Extreme Risk Protection Orders (2019 and 2018). Kim is also the co-author of a recent Journal of American Medical Association (JAMA) publication: Practitioners’ Perspective on Extreme Risk Protection Orders, June 2020. Kim received her B.A. from, Pepperdine University, and her J.D. cum laude, from, Seattle University School of Law.

Elizabeth Hendren is Advocacy Counsel at Sexual Violence Law Center, where she leads legislative advocacy in addition to representing survivors in their protection order, criminal privacy, and family law matters. In 2012, she created the Reentry Initiated through Services and Education (RISE) Project at Northwest Justice Project, which provided comprehensive civil legal services to currently and formerly incarcerated survivors. Elizabeth managed RISE for over ten years, operating two monthly family law clinics in Washington Corrections Center for Women as well as Mission Creek Corrections Center for Women, in addition to representing formerly incarcerated mothers in their family law and civil protection order issues across the state. Elizabeth serves by appointment on the Washington State Supreme Court Gender & Justice Commission, where she chairs the Incarceration, Gender & Justice Committee. In 2012 she was the recipient of the Seattle University Leadership for Justice Fellowship, and in 2017 she was a recipient of the Washington Young Lawyers Committee Public Service and Leadership Award, as well as Northwest Justice Project’s Innovation Award. 

Dawn Pullin, Spokane Tribal Citizen, is the Tribal Liaison for the Washington State Patrol. Dawn has been working for the Washington State Patrol for over 3-years. Her work experience includes working for the Indian Health Service as a Contracting Officer, the Spokane Tribe’s Temporary Assistance for Needy Families as their Director and later as the Spokane Tribe’s Chief Executive Officer. Dawn is also an entrepreneur and owns her own health and wellness company and has recently initiated her own non-profit organization. She recently joined the Spokane Regional Domestic Violence Coalition Board as well as the Innovations Human Trafficking Collaborative Board.

In 2003, she completed her Bachelor’s Degree in Business Administration from Eastern Washington University and in 2006, she completed her MBA from the University of Phoenix.

As a law enforcement officer for over twenty-six years, I have a well-rounded law enforcement career. I have specialized training and job experience in the areas of domestic violence, sexual assault, and child abuse. I have experience in conducting complicated homicide investigations as a lead investigator in multiple homicide cases, sexual assault, child abuse and domestic violence. I have assisted on numerous other investigators with cases that have required a multitude of investigative hours. I have extensive investigative, interviewing and interrogation experience. As a law enforcement officer, I was the visionary of the Nampa Family Justice Center. I was actively involved developing the first Family Justice Center in the state of Idaho. The Nampa Family Justice Center is recognized as one of the original Family Justice Center’s under President Bush’s Family Justice Center Initiative. I also led the Nampa Police Departments participation in the International Association of Chiefs of Police Integrity, Action and Justice: Strengthening Law Enforcement Response to Domestic and Sexual Violence Demonstration Initiative.

Judicial Track

Ginger Johnson is the Owner and Supervisor at Relationship Advantage. Relationship Advantage provides licensed and certified Domestic Violence Treatment in Washington State. Ginger provides Mental Health Consultant services for EACAP and Head Start programs in Spokane region, and is a Relationship Coach with experience in trauma informed therapy, conflict, life skills, and communication. She is a founding member of the SRDVC Board, and currently serves as the Treasurer. Relationship Advantage has contracts with DCYF and DOC for Domestic Violence Intervention Treatment. With experience in community and court victim advocacy, she is familiar with processes and procedures of court room dynamics. Ginger serves on the Washington DV High Risk Team, and continues to be relied on as a domestic violence expert witness in Municipal, Superior, and Federal Court. As a leader in the Spokane Region’s DV community for over 12 years, her passion for people and broad knowledge has inspired others to take a stand and make a difference.

Faith E. Lutze, Ph.D., is a Professor in the Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology at Washington State University. Her research interests include police use of lethality risk assessments, gender and justice, and evidence-based practice in criminal justice. Dr. Lutze has published the results of her research in numerous peer-reviewed journals related to criminal justice, rehabilitation and reentry, and gender-based violence. She teaches courses on gender and justice, violence toward women, institutional and community corrections, and is a certified instructor for the Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program. She is intent on promoting justice, human rights, and activism that encourages professionals to advance justice through research, education, policy, and practice.

Alice M. Ellyson, MS, PhD, is an Assistant Professor at the University of Washington, specializing in gender-based violence research. She earned her BBA in Economics from Mercer University and completed her MS and PhD in Economics with a focus on health, law, and public policy at Florida State University. Dr. Ellyson conducted post-doctoral training at the University of Washington’s Comparative Health Outcomes, Policy, and Economics Institute. Her research aims to reduce gender-based violence and its negative consequences by providing actionable policy recommendations. Using rigorous empirical methods, she evaluates firearm prohibitions in domestic violence protection orders, explores higher education policies’ impact on gender-based violence among students, and examines threats and violence involving weapons among children in homes with intimate partner violence.

Elizabeth Hendren is Advocacy Counsel at Sexual Violence Law Center, where she leads legislative advocacy in addition to representing survivors in their protection order, criminal privacy, and family law matters. In 2012, she created the Reentry Initiated through Services and Education (RISE) Project at Northwest Justice Project, which provided comprehensive civil legal services to currently and formerly incarcerated survivors. Elizabeth managed RISE for over ten years, operating two monthly family law clinics in Washington Corrections Center for Women as well as Mission Creek Corrections Center for Women, in addition to representing formerly incarcerated mothers in their family law and civil protection order issues across the state. Elizabeth serves by appointment on the Washington State Supreme Court Gender & Justice Commission, where she chairs the Incarceration, Gender & Justice Committee. In 2012 she was the recipient of the Seattle University Leadership for Justice Fellowship, and in 2017 she was a recipient of the Washington Young Lawyers Committee Public Service and Leadership Award, as well as Northwest Justice Project’s Innovation Award

As a law enforcement officer for over twenty-six years, I have a well-rounded law enforcement career. I have specialized training and job experience in the areas of domestic violence, sexual assault, and child abuse. I have experience in conducting complicated homicide investigations as a lead investigator in multiple homicide cases, sexual assault, child abuse and domestic violence. I have assisted on numerous other investigators with cases that have required a multitude of investigative hours. I have extensive investigative, interviewing and interrogation experience. As a law enforcement officer, I was the visionary of the Nampa Family Justice Center. I was actively involved developing the first Family Justice Center in the state of Idaho. The Nampa Family Justice Center is recognized as one of the original Family Justice Center’s under President Bush’s Family Justice Center Initiative. I also led the Nampa Police Departments participation in the International Association of Chiefs of Police Integrity, Action and Justice: Strengthening Law Enforcement Response to Domestic and Sexual Violence Demonstration Initiative.

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